The Lumbee (or Lumber) Indians of South Carolina. Descendants of the Hatteras Indians of Croatan (Portsmouth Island) and the English of the 'Lost Colony' of Roanoke (Cedar Island). Part 2.

Record Number: 
HUGU001
Citation: 

Huguenin, Charles A., and Robert M. Dell. “The Lumbee (or Lumber) Indians of South Carolina. Descendants of the Hatteras Indians of Croatan (Portsmouth Island) and the English of the 'Lost Colony' of Roanoke (Cedar Island). Part 2.” NEARA Newsletter (Milford, N.H.: New England Antiquities Research Association) 7.3 (1970): 53-55.

Annotation: 

Discusses the Lost Colony theory of Lumbee origins from the perspective of a journal owned by William H. Jordan. The journal was kept by his forbear, Robert Jordan, who was supposedly one of the Lost Colonists. William H. Jordan also claims to possess a journal kept by Eleanor Dare, mother of Virginia Dare. The journal was discussed by C. Howe in Solving the riddle of the Lost Colony (1947), in which he described excepts Jordan showed him which Jordan had converted to modern English. Dare's journal revealed that twelve of the Lost Colonists had relocated to Friendly Fort, on the Pamlico River, 25 miles below Washington, N.C. 

The second half of the article discusses the heritage of Henry Berry Lowry, as described by Clarence E. Lowrey, the land ownership by his great-grandfather James Lowrey, and the other grantor on the 1732 land deed from King George II, Henry Berry. The authors surmise how Henry Berry Lowry became “a remnant of White's Lost Colony.” They speculate on how Berry's Bay, between Hunting Quarters and Cedar Island, got its name.

Key Source?: 
no
First Appeared in 1994 Book?: 
no
Category Tags: 
Publication Type: 
Other Features of Work: 
3 notes
These libraries have back years of this newsletter. Check the library catalog of the library of your choice to see if the year you need is available.