Not so well red: Native Americans in the Southern civil rights movement reconsidered

Record Number: 
LEWI001
Citation: 

Lewis, George. “Not so well red: Native Americans in the Southern civil rights movement reconsidered.” Borderlines: Studies in American Culture (Swansea, Wales) 3.4 1996): 362-375.

Annotation: 

Maintains that histories of civil rights in the South have neglected the role of Native Americans and have focused on Black-White relations. Lewis attempts to redress the imbalance by describing various periods of Lumbee civil rights, focusing on their interactions - politically, socially, and culturally - with Blacks and Whites. Discusses the 1958 Ku Klux Klan routing; Lumbee insistence on a separate school system, rather than attending Black schools; Lumbees elected to public office; sit-ins by Lumbee school children following the enactment of Robeson County's desegregation plan; and “The Movement,” a political alliance of Lumbees and Black between 1964 and 1970. Relies heavily on the writings of Gerald Sider and erroneously states that he is Lumbee.

Key Source?: 
no
First Appeared in 1994 Book?: 
no
Category Tags: 
Publication Type: 
Other Features of Work: 
33 references
Additional Information: 
Ku Klux Klan routing (Maxton, 1958) | The Movement | Sit-ins (at Indian schools)