Henry Berry Lowry era

Key Sources

Record Number Citation
OAKL003

Oakley, Christopher Arris. “The legend of Henry Berry Lowry: Strike at the Wind! and the Lumbee Indians of North Carolina.” Mississippi quarterly 60.1 (Winter/Spring 2007): 59–80. Key source

MAYN001

Maynor, Malinda. “Violence and the racial boundary: fact and fiction in the swamps of Robeson County, 1831-1871.” Honors Thesis (History and Literature), Harvard College, 1995.

Sources

Record Number Citation
1117

Arrowood, Charles F. “The outlaws of Scuffletown.” Unpublished typescript. N.d. 14 p. 

1075

Criminal Action Papers Concerning Henry Berry Lowry. MS. North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh. 1 box. [Not seen]

GODW001

Godwin, Rebecca L. "Breaking (and Keeping) Silences: Tricksters in Josephine Humphreys's Nowhere Else on Earth." Mississippi Quarterly 65.1 (2012): 33-49.

LOWR006

Lowry, David. "Speaking of secrets and mischief." North American dialogue 14.2 (2011): 30-32.

EVAN002

Evans, William McKee. “Native Americans in the Civil War: Three perspectives.” Civil War citizens: race, ethnicity, and identity in America's bloodiest conflict. Ed. Susannah J. Ural. New York: New York UP, 2010. 187-212

RACH002

Rach, Amber. “Local Experts Contribute to History Channel Documentary.” UNC-Pembroke newswire Monday, February 5, 2007.

AFTE001

Aftershock: Beyond the Civil War. DVD (91 min.) A History Channel production. Dir. David W. Padrusch. Prod. Matt Koed. New York : A&E Home Video; dist. by New Video, 2007. A&E Home Video item AAE-77017.

INDI005

Indian warriors: the untold story of the Civil War. DVD (50 min.). Dir. Geoffrey Madeja. Prod. Bernard Dudek. The History Channel, 2006. Item #AAE-76954

LELA001

Leland, Elizabeth. “The land of a legend.” Charlotte Observer Sunday, 16 June 2002.

PUGH001

Pugh, Eneida Sanderson. “Rhoda Strong Lowry: The Swamp Queen of Scuffletown.” American Indian Culture and Research Journal 26.1 (2002): 67-81. 42 notes.

MAYN011

Maynor, Malinda. “Was Henry Berry Lowrie a turpentiner?” Carolina Indian Voice 6 December 2001: 2.

TAUK001

Taukchiray, Wes. “Henry Berry Lowrie was never arrested, tried and convicted.” Carolina Indian Voice Thursday, 29 March 2001: 2.

THRO002

“'Through Native Eyes: The Henry Berry Lowrie Story' to be part of Library of Congress project.” Carolina Indian Voice 25 May 2000: 1.

BART007

Barton, Bruce. “Looking back while walking forward (column): 'Distinguished visitor, extraordinary application.” Carolina Indian Voice Thursday, February 10, 2000: 2.

GAZD001

Gazda, Antoinette. “Through Native Eyes: The Henry Berry Lowrie Story (A Native American 'Robin Hood') - N.C. Director Van Coleman brings the legendary story of Henry Berry Lowrie to the screen.” Reel Carolina: Journal of Film and Video 5.5. (September 1999) : 8, 20, 23.

DOUG001

Douglas, Hector, reporter. “Story of Henry Berry Lowry, as chronicled in the new movie Through Native Eyes.” Morning Edition. National Public Radio. 22 July 1999. Transcript

LEAD001

“The leaders of the pack: tribal leaders assist in production of Through Native Eyes.” Carolina Indian Voice 1 April 1999: 1.

MAYN002

Maynor-Clark, Vinita. “Cookie's Corner 1999 (column).” Carolina Indian Voice 11 March 1999: 2.

BART001

Barton, Garry Lewis. “Through Native Eyes premiers May 1st at UNC-P.” Carolina Indian Voice 11 March 1999: 1.

BART003

Barton, Garry Lewis. “Henry Berry, a bigger-than-life hero.” Carolina Indian Voice 21 January 1999: 2.

VMC0001

Maynor-Clark, Vinita. “Through Indian Eyes draws hundreds for auditions.” Carolina Indian Voice 21 January 1999:1. 

MAYN004

Maynor-Clark, Vinita. “'Through Native Eyes' Draws Hundreds for Auditions.” Carolina Indian Voice 21 January 1999: 1.

MAYN000

Maynor-Clark, Vinita. “Through Native Eyes (The Henry Berry Lowry Story).” Carolina Indian Voice 7 January 1999:1.

SMIT001

 “Rhoda Strong Lowry, 1849-1909.” In: North Carolina women: making history. By Margaret Supplee Smith and Emily Herring Wilson. Chapel Hill; London: North Carolina UP, 1999. Pages 154-157; notes on pages 327-328.

THRO001

Through Native Eyes: The Henry Berry Lowry Story. Videotape. Production, direction, and story by D. Van Coleman. “A NoDoze Production of a D. Van Coleman Film,” 1999. 52 min., 22 sec. 

CLAR003

Clark, Vinita Maynor. The historical making of the movie Through Native Eyes: The Henry Berry Lowrie story. Pembroke, NC: Carolina Indian Voice, 1999.

KNIC023

Knick, Stanley. “Along the Robeson Trail (column).” Carolina Indian Voice 5 November 1998: 5.

KNIC020

Knick, Stanley. “Along the Robeson Trail (column).” Carolina Indian Voice 29 October 1998:5.

KNIC021

Knick, Stanley. “Along the Robeson Trail (column).” Carolina Indian Voice 15 October 1998: 2.

MILL003

Miller, David James.  “Native Americans and the Confederacy during the Civil War:  a study of the peculiar fight in Robeson County, North Carolina.”  Honors essay. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1998.  63 pages.

WILK001

Wilkins, David E. “Henry Berry Lowry: champion of the dispossessed.” Race, Gender & Class 13.2 (Winter 1996): 97-111. 

HAUP001

Hauptman, Lawrence M.  “River pilots and swamp guerillas: Pamunkee and Lumbee unionists.”  In: Between Two Fires: American Indians in the Civil War.  New York: Free Press, 1995.  Pp. 65-66, 76-85.

1135

Knick, Stanley. “Did Henry Berry Lowrie escape Robeson to become the Modoc’s Captain Jack?” Robesonian 25 Feb. 1993: 4A.

1134

Evans, W. McKee. “Henry Berry Lowry.” Dictionary of North Carolina Biography. Ed. William S. Powell. Vol. 4. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P, 1991. Pp. 104-05.

1133

Waldman, Carl. Who was who in Native American history: Indians and non-Indians from early contacts through 1900. New York: Facts on File, 1990. Pp. 211-12. 

1132

Conley, Manuel A., and Ginger Oxendine-Roberts. “Henry Berry Lowry House, North Carolina Indian Cultural Center: preliminary evaluation of interpretive data.” Paper for Public History (HST 370). Pembroke State U, 7 Dec. 1988.

1131

Henderson, David H. “Face to face with the Lumbee ghost?” The State 56.5 (Oct. 1988): 10-13.

1130

Massengill, Stephen E. “The detectives of William W. Holden, 1869-1870.” North Carolina Historical Review 62.4 (Oct. 1985): 448-87.

1129

Wetmore, Ruth. “Henry Berry Lowrie, the swamp outlaw.” News and Observer, 400th anniversary edition, July 1985: Sec. 6 p. 16.

1128

Cooper, Richard. Henry Berry Lowry: Rebel With a Cause. Famous Tar Heels. Raleigh: Creative Publications, 1985. 

1127

Jones, Rosalyn Jacobs. “Upward mobility: a historical narrative. The John W. Jacobs story.” Diss. Middle Tennessee State U, 1983.

1126

Brown, Dick. “More Lowry saga.” Fayetteville Observer 5 July 1981: E1. 

1125

Edwards, John Carver. “Harris County bounty men and the ubiquitous Mr. Applewhite.” Atlanta Historical Journal 24.1 (Spring 1980): 53-62.

1124

Barton, Garry Lewis. The Life and Times of Henry Berry Lowry. Pembroke: Lumbee Pub. Co., 1979. New edition. N.p.: Published and printed by Garry Lewis Barton, Feb. 1992. 

1123

Blackburn, Charles. “The nefarious adventures of the Lowry Gang.” The Near East 3.4 (Sept.-Oct. 1975): 18-21. Also in Tar Heel8.5 (July 1980): 24-25, 63.

1122

Barton, Bruce. “Henry Berry Lowry and the Lumbee Indians.” Lutheran Women 13.5 (May 1975): 3-7.

1121

Barton, Lew. “Henry Berry Lowry, Lumbee guerilla warrior of Reconstruction days.” Carolina Indian Voice 1.7 (14 Sept. 1972). 

1120

Arendell, Banks. “‘Shake’ cheats the hangman.” The State 39.13 (1 Dec. 1971): 17-18.

1119

“Lowry: ‘He didn’t kill as many ... as Moses’.” Greensboro Daily News 17 Jan. 1971: A15.

1116

Regan, Mary. “Dark fame surrounded ‘Queen’.” News and Observer 23 Apr. 1967: Sec. 4 p. 1.

1115

Woodward, Susan Holly. “A grandfather’s tales of the Lowery brothers.” North Carolina Folklore 10.2 (Dec. 1962): 17-19.

1114

Jenkins, Jay. “Lowry’s daughter buried by Indians.” Charlotte Observer 2 April 1962: Sec. B p. 1.

1113

Dunnagan, Claude. “Henry Lowery’s private six-year war against the South.” Male 11.7 (July 1961): 33-35, 39-45.

1112

Rockwell, Paul A. “Lumbees rebelled against proposed draft by South.” Asheville Citizen-Times 2 Feb. 1958. [UNC-WL Clippings File]

1111

Manning, Charles. “Last of Lowerys recalls saga of death and terror.” Greensboro Daily News 19 Jan. 1958: A13.

1110

“‘Rubber’ coffin check rattles outlaw’s bones.” Greensboro Daily News 7 Sept. 1956. [Included in entry 468.]

1109

McEachern, Stuart. “Eight years of terror.” The State 20.26 (29 Nov. 1952): 6.

1108

Franklin, John Hope. “The enslavement of free negroes in North Carolina.” Journal of Negro History 29.4 (Oct. 1944): 401-28. 

1107

 Lawrence, R. C. “Wishart and the Loweries.” The State 26 Aug. 1939: 6-7. Rpt. in Robesonian 28 Aug. 1939: 8.

1106

Newsom, Ruby Crockett. “McKay birthday celebration.” Robesonian 16 June 1939: 4.

1105

“Hero of Lowry Gang episode passes at age of 89 years.” Robesonian 23 Feb. 1938: I-1.

1104

“Famed outlaw’s rifle returned.” Robesonian 12 April 1937: 7.

1103

“Claims Henry Berry Lowry, leader of band of outlaws, alive at 92.” Robesonian 5 April 1937: 1. Rpt. in News and Observer 9 May 1937: 1.

BETH001

 "Account of incidents in Dillon County, South Carolina resembling those of the Lowry Band in Robeson County." In: Kinfolks: A genealogical and biographical record. By William Curry Harllee. New Orleans: Searcy & Pfaff, 1937. Volume 3, pages 2434-2435.

1102

“Last of Lowry Gang [John Dial] baptised at 83.” Robesonian 16 May 1935: 1.

1101

Martin, L. “Robeson’s 10-year reign of terror recalled.” Charlotte Observer 22 April 1934: Sec. 3 p. 2. Rpt. Robesonian 26 Apr. 1934: 7; 3 May 1934: 7.

1100

“Museum gets Henry Berrie Lowrey’s gun.” Robesonian 31 Oct. 1927: 3.

1099

Farris, James J. “The Lowrie Gang: an episode in the history of Robeson County, N.C.: 1864-1874.” Historical Papers Published by the Trinity College Historical Society. Ser. XV. Durham: Duke UP, 1925. Pp. 55-93.

1098

“Fake picture famous bandit.” Robesonian 4 Aug. 1924: 5.

1097

Bibson, J. Press, Sr. “What became of Henry Berry Lowrey, notorious Robeson bandit chief?” Robesonian 12 June 1922: 6.

1096

Currie, A. D. “A run from the Lowrie Gang.” Robesonian 1 Jan. 1917: 3; 29 Jan. 1917: 2.

1095

“Murdock MacDonald: a true story of the days of the outlaws in Robeson County, North Carolina.” Charlotte Observer 3 March 1912: 13.

1094

Cy. “The Lowry Outlaws.” The Guilford Collegian 24.3 (Nov. 1911): 90-94; 24.5 (Jan. 1912): 152-57; 24.8 (Apr. 1912): 285-96. [GPL-NC Biog Clippings File]

1093

Scotchman, A. “The Lowrie Gang: a portion of Col. Olds’ article false and misleading.” Robesonian 13 July 1908: 1.

1092

Humphrey, J. W. “Henry Berry Lowery: another version of how he became an outlaw.” Robesonian 6 July 1908: 2.

1091

Fulton, David Bryant. "Henry Berry Lowery, the North Carolina outlaw. A tale of the Reconstruction period." From The Citizen. Rpt. in: “Eagle clippings” by Jack Thorne [pseud.], Newspaper Correspondent and Storyteller ... a Collection of his Writings [submitted] to Various Newspapers. Brooklyn: D. B. Fulton, 1907. Pp. 65-71.

1090

“Henry Berry Lowry is dead.” Lumberton Argus 3 Nov. 1905: 3.

1089

“Personal and Local Dept.–[untitled note].” Robesonian 3 Feb. 1905: 5.

1088

“Through Scuffletown.” The Lumberton Argus 14 June 1904: 4.

1087

“Rhoda Lowrie: widow of the noted outlaw in jail for retailing liquor without license.” Robesonian 10 Nov. 1897: [3].

1086

Gorman, John C. “Henry Berry Lowry paper.” Unpublished manuscript. [1894?] Housed in the North Carolina Division of Archives and History, Raleigh, N.C. 26p. [Photocopy at RCPL]

1085

Triplett, Frank. History, romance and philosophy of great American crimes and criminals .... New York: N. D. Thompson and Co., 1884. Pp. 464-92.

1084

“Two of the Lowery Gang.” [Charleston, S.C.] News and Courier 23 July 1878: 1.

1082

“The Lowery Gang.” New York Times 4 May 1874: P. 2 col. 3.

LOWR002

“The Lowrey outlaws: particulars of the murder of Col. F. M. Wishart in Robeson County, North Carolina—a base and treacherous assassination.” New York Times May 8, 1872, page 3.

1081

“The North Carolina Bandits.” Harper’s Weekly 16 (30 March 1872): 249, 251-2.

1080

“A new expedition: proposition to capture the Lowery Gang of Outlaws–singular enterprise of a fourth ward character.” New York Times 18 March 1872: P. 5 col. 3.

1079

U.S. Cong. Joint Select Comm. to Inquire into the Condition of Affairs in the Late Insurrectionary States. Report ... on the Condition of Affairs in the Late Insurrectionary States. Made to the Two Houses of Congress, 19 Feb. 1872. 42nd Cong., 2nd Sess. Report No. 41, Part 1. 1872. Rpt. New York: AMS, 1968. See Vol. 2, pp. 283-304.

1078

Townsend, George Alfred, comp. The Swamp Outlaws: or, The North Carolina Bandits; being a complete history of the modern Rob Roys and Robin Hoods. The Red Wolf Series. New York: Robert M. DeWitt, 1872. Another edition: The Swamp Outlaws of North Carolina. Philadelphia: Old Franklin Publishing House, 1872.

1077

“A history of the capture of the notorious outlaw George Applewhite, alias, Ranse Lowery, of the Lowery gang of outlaws, or Robeson County, N.C. ... ” Columbus, GA: Thos. Gilbert, 1872. 12 p. Rpt. in entry 1125.

NORT001

“The North Carolina outlaws—Lowrey and his gang—the authorities defied—pursuit by the soldiers.” New York Times October 11, 1871, page 11.

1076

“Robin Hood come again.” New York Times 22 July 1871: P. 4 col. 5.

SHER001

“A sheriff’s posse ambuscaded by Negroes—three killed and three wounded.” New York Times July 12, 1871, page 1.

ARE001

“Are the Robeson County, N.C., outlaws KuKlux?” New York Times May 16, 1871, p.1.

NOTO001

“A notorious desperado killed in North Carolina—a company of soldiers after his confederates—a defaulting book-keeper in Chicago.” New York Times December 18, 1870, page 1.

PURS001

“Pursuit of an organized band of Negro robbers and murderers—an encounter with the outlaws.” New York Times October 8, 1870, page 1.

1074

Wishart, Francis Marion. “Diary of Col. Francis M. Wishart, commander of action against the Lowry outlaws of Robeson County, North Carolina, 1864-1872, and comments by an unknown author.” Typescript. Presented by Mrs. Annabel Wishart Lane. 

MAYN003