Welcome to the Lumbee Indians: An Annotated Bibliography

Lumbee Home

Croatoan Indian home, single story, wood with twin brick fireplace. Image provided by the N.C. Museum of History.

Lumbee home photo

Normal School 1910

Superintendent Edens and children at the Croatoan Normal School. Image provided by the N.C. Museum of History.

Croatoan Normal School, 1910

Locklear Brooks

A Croatoan Indian home, front view, with man and woman to right of door. Two young women at left. Image provided by the N.C. Museum of History.

A Croatoan Indian home

Prospect School 1926

Students of Prospect School, 1926. Image provided by the N.C. Museum of History.

Prospect School 1926

Lumbee Farm

Lumbee farm, with home and a horse-drawn wagon in background. Image provided by the N.C. Museum of History.

Lumbee farm

Washington Lowery Home

Home of Washington Lowery, with family in front; house is small, wood, with three men sitting in front; woman and child behind, seven children at left. Image provided by the N.C. Museum of History.

Home of Washington Lowery
previous pauseresume next

This site is designed to provide a comprehensive, scholarly, online resource for information on the Lumbee Indians and related topics. For more information about this site and a general overview of how it was compiled, please refer to the page, "About this site."

Notable Lumbee

Arlinda Locklear has spent nearly forty years in the practice of Native American law. Working for the Native American Rights Fund, and later for Patton Boggs LLP, she has defended Native American tribes in federal and state claims related to treaty land and water rights and to tribal jurisdiction on reservations. She has also established a national reputation regarding federal acknowledgment of Native American tribes. She testified before Congress in 1988 (while representing the Lumbee Tribe) on the need for better procedures for federal acknowledgment, and again in 1989, recommending approval of the Indian Federal Acknowledgment Administrative Procedures Act of 1989. From 1987 through March 2010, she represented the Lumbee Tribe pro bono in its efforts to obtain full federal acknowledgment.